1.4 Empower Team Members and Stakeholders

People - Empower Team Members and Stakeholders

Enablers

IdEnabler
1.4.1Organize around team strengths
1.4.2Support team task accountability
1.4.3Evaluate demonstration of task accountability
1.4.4Determine and bestow level(s) of decision-making authority

Empowering team members and stakeholders is a crucial aspect of project management that can lead to successful project outcomes. It involves providing the team with the necessary resources, support, autonomy and authority to make decisions and take ownership of their work. The following are some of the key enablers that can help in empowering team members and stakeholders.

1.4.1 Organize around team strengths

This involves identifying the skills, competencies, and preferences of each team member and stakeholder, and assigning them roles and tasks that match their strengths. This can increase their motivation, engagement, and performance. Some tools and techniques that can help with this are:

  • SWOT analysis: It can be used to identify the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats of a team. By identifying the strengths of each team member, project managers can organize the team in a way that leverages these strengths.

  • Skills inventory: It is a list of all the experiences, professional skills, and educational qualifications of team members and stakeholders. It can be used to identify the skills and competencies of each team member. By identifying the skills of each team member, project managers can organize the team in a way that leverages these skills.

  • Personality tests: Personality tests can be used to identify the personality traits of each team member. By identifying the personality traits of each team member, project managers can organize the team in a way that leverages these traits.

Difference between traditional and agile project management: In traditional project management, team strengths are usually determined by the project manager based on the project plan and requirements. In agile project management, team strengths are often self-identified by the team members based on their interests and abilities. Agile teams are also more cross-functional and collaborative, meaning that team members can share and learn from each other’s strengths.

1.4.2 Support team task accountability

Supporting team task accountability involves creating an environment where team members feel responsible for their assigned tasks, leading to increased engagement and productivity. Some tools and techniques that can help with this are:

  • Work Breakdown Structure (WBS): A WBS can be used to break down the project into smaller, more manageable tasks. By breaking down the project into smaller tasks, project managers can ensure that each team member is aware of their responsibilities and is held accountable for their tasks.
  • Kanban Board: A Kanban board or other project management tools (such as Jira, Wrike, Smartsheet) can be used for tracking work.
  • Feedback mechanisms: Methods of collecting and providing constructive feedback to team members and stakeholders, such as surveys, interviews, reviews, coaching, or mentoring.
  • Responsibility Assignment Matrix (RAM): A RAM can be used to assign tasks and responsibilities to each team member. By assigning tasks and responsibilities to each team member, project managers can ensure that each team member is aware of their responsibilities and is held accountable for their tasks.

Difference between traditional and agile project management: In traditional project management, task accountability is usually enforced by the project manager through formal and periodic reviews and reports. In agile project management, task accountability is usually fostered by the team members through informal and frequent feedback and recognition. Agile teams are also more self-organizing and autonomous, meaning that team members can take ownership and responsibility for their tasks.

1.4.3 Evaluate demonstration of task accountability

Evaluating the demonstration of task accountability involves assessing how well team members are fulfilling their responsibilities and taking ownership of their work. Some tools and techniques that can help with this are:

  • Key Performance Indicators (KPIs): Quantitative or qualitative measures that evaluate the progress and performance of team members and stakeholders against the project objectives and expectations.
  • Performance reports: Documents that summarize and analyze the performance data and information of team members and stakeholders, such as work completed, quality results, issues, risks, or changes.
  • Performance reviews: They can be used to evaluate the performance of each team member. By conducting performance reviews, project managers can evaluate the performance of each team member based on the agreed-upon metrics.

Difference between traditional and agile project management: In traditional project management, evaluation is usually done at the end of the project or phase, using predefined metrics and criteria. In agile project management, evaluation is usually done throughout the project or iteration, using flexible and adaptive measures and standards. Agile teams are also more focused on delivering value and satisfying the customer, meaning that evaluation is more customer-centric and feedback-driven.

1.4.4 Determine and bestow level(s) of decision-making authority

This involves defining the scope and boundaries of the decision-making power of team members and stakeholders, and delegating the appropriate level of authority to them based on their roles, responsibilities, and skills. Some tools and techniques that can help with this are:

  • Decision-making models: Frameworks or processes that guide the decision-making of team members and stakeholders, such as rational, intuitive, consensus, or participatory models.
  • Decision-making tools: Decision-making tools such as voting, fist of five, planning poker can assist the team to select a course of action from different alternatives.
  • Delegation techniques: Methods of transferring decision-making authority and responsibility to team members and stakeholders, such as empowerment, consultation, or escalation techniques.

Difference between traditional and agile project management: In traditional project management, decision-making authority is usually centralized and hierarchical, meaning that the project manager or the sponsor has the final say on most decisions. In agile project management, decision-making authority is usually decentralized and distributed, meaning that the team members or the customer have more influence and involvement in the decisions. Agile teams are also more empowered and collaborative, meaning that decisions are more based on consensus and participation.

Last updated: February 18, 2024